blackandbutch:

I discovered Dr.Kortney Ziegler’s work during two difficult phases of my life 
1. Having no analysis of my why the way I navigated the world as a black, queer, female assigned person in this culture and finding someone with the words via the blog blac(k)ademic.  
2. The film still black: a portrait of black transmen , which made me realize the power and importance of visibility , and made me realize how little of this I had and needed as a black, queer, trans person.
In short, he let me do the logo for his newer project Trans H4CK, an organization utilizing technology to help trans folks gain more access to resources and made one of my dreams come true.
Thank you.
Links
http://blackademic.com/
http://www.transhack.org/

blackandbutch:

I discovered Dr.Kortney Ziegler’s work during two difficult phases of my life 

1. Having no analysis of my why the way I navigated the world as a black, queer, female assigned person in this culture and finding someone with the words via the blog blac(k)ademic.  

2. The film still black: a portrait of black transmen , which made me realize the power and importance of visibility , and made me realize how little of this I had and needed as a black, queer, trans person.

In short, he let me do the logo for his newer project Trans H4CK, an organization utilizing technology to help trans folks gain more access to resources and made one of my dreams come true.

Thank you.

Links

http://blackademic.com/

http://www.transhack.org/

(via lowoncliches)

How I Discovered Gender Discrimination

whatwouldkingleonidasdo:

It was the late ’90s and I was at an interesting phase of my career. For the first time in my life I possessed relevant qualifications, experience and could also show a successful track record in my chosen career path. I had the job seeker’s trifecta. It was also summer and my current employer…

10 academic survival tips

shiftingself:

so my friends sent this link to me today and the first tip of this article defined that inadequate feeling I have been feeling since arriving to grad school “Impostor syndrome” is what I have been “suffering”

  • Be confident in your abilities.
    • If you feel like a fraud, you very likely are…

(Source: crunkfeministcollective.com)

Silent Technical Privilege

lifeandcode:

uconnharassment:

As a novice computer programmer, I always got the benefit of the doubt—because I looked the part.

The part about the internship is familiar… But it’s 20 years later and nothing has changed.

This is What it's Like to Be a Woman at a Bitcoin Meetup

ariannasimpson:

He then starts to look at me like I’ve suddenly morphed into a unicorn. Literally: bulging eyes, mouth slightly agape, the whole nine yards. Apparently the expected response would have been that I was Ryan’s  friend/girlfriend/sister who had somehow accidentally ended up there. “Seriously? You mean you actually own bitcoins? You don’t look like someone who would even know about Bitcoin!”

(Source: ariannasimpson)

I’ve been programming since I was 10, but I don’t feel like a “hacker”

(Source: techladymafia)

itswalky:

Shortpacked!: Genderless

itswalky:

Shortpacked!: Genderless

(via tinuqin)

thewrathofkwan:

First Stanford code poetry slam reveals the literary side of computer code
Organized by Melissa Kagen, a graduate student in German studies, and Kurt James Werner, a graduate student in computer-based music theory and acoustics, the event was designed to explore the creative aspects of computer programming. With presentations that ranged from poems written in a computer language format to those that incorporated digital media, the slam demonstrated the entrants’ broad interpretation of the definition of “code poetry.” Kagen and Werner developed the code poetry slam as a means of investigating the poetic potentials of computer-programming languages. 
#nerdgasm

thewrathofkwan:

First Stanford code poetry slam reveals the literary side of computer code

Organized by Melissa Kagen, a graduate student in German studies, and Kurt James Werner, a graduate student in computer-based music theory and acoustics, the event was designed to explore the creative aspects of computer programming. With presentations that ranged from poems written in a computer language format to those that incorporated digital media, the slam demonstrated the entrants’ broad interpretation of the definition of “code poetry.” Kagen and Werner developed the code poetry slam as a means of investigating the poetic potentials of computer-programming languages. 

#nerdgasm

(via daniehacks)

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

Grace Hopper Lego minifig!
(Flickr)

gendrr

A social network for gender-variant people (under development).

gamingfeminism:

psicologicamenteblog:

I think that this topic is truly important. What do you think about it?

Source: Are stereotypes keeping women away from science?

Follow Francesca Mura on Pinterest

Rozlett just told us about this, pointing out that women face a lot of challenges going into STEM fields, something that makes it harder for women to enter these fields (either because they are told they cannot make it or they themselves think that).

So, it’s not about women’s intelligence, it’s about misogyny. I’m sure that more-female-logic won’t believe this though.

(via tinuqin)

jessaround:

Grace Murray Hopper (December 9, 1906 – January 1, 1992) was an American computer scientist and United States Navy Rear Admiral. A pioneer in the field, she was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer, and developed the first compiler for a computer programming language. She conceptualized the idea of machine-independent programming languages, which led to the development of COBOL, one of the first modern programming languages. She is credited with popularizing the term “debugging" for fixing computer glitches (inspired by an actual moth removed from the computer). Owing to the breadth of her accomplishments and her naval rank, she is sometimes referred to as “Amazing Grace”.The U.S. Navy destroyer USS Hopper (DDG-70) is named for her, as was the Cray XE6 ”Hopper” supercomputer at NERSC. (from Wikipedia)
She’s also the basis of the Google doodle today.
Happy birthday to one of my heroes and role models, RADM Hopper! May the women who follow in your footsteps be even close to as groundbreaking as you were.

jessaround:

Grace Murray Hopper (December 9, 1906 – January 1, 1992) was an American computer scientist and United States Navy Rear Admiral. A pioneer in the field, she was one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer, and developed the first compiler for a computer programming language. She conceptualized the idea of machine-independent programming languages, which led to the development of COBOL, one of the first modern programming languages. She is credited with popularizing the term “debugging" for fixing computer glitches (inspired by an actual moth removed from the computer). Owing to the breadth of her accomplishments and her naval rank, she is sometimes referred to as “Amazing Grace”.The U.S. Navy destroyer USS Hopper (DDG-70) is named for her, as was the Cray XE6 ”Hopper” supercomputer at NERSC. (from Wikipedia)

She’s also the basis of the Google doodle today.

Happy birthday to one of my heroes and role models, RADM Hopper! May the women who follow in your footsteps be even close to as groundbreaking as you were.

(via daniehacks)